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  #1  
Old 9th September 2009, 08:49 AM
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Default Choosing a frame.

Purely as a matter of interest:
When making prints; do people here, make the print and then think about the mount, frame and type of glass as an integral part of the overall presentation (colour of mat, frame etc; for each print) or have a set number of standard sizes and buy framing in bulk?
The reason I ask is that I have watched my wife (a water colour artist) take some time matching the mount board and frame for each picture. Because as she rightly says, framing can kill a print if not done well.
Now I see a lot of exhibitions where B&W gets presented in what seems the standard black frame with varied off white mounts; regardless of them being toned or not.
Very seldom if ever, do I see this subject mentioned in photographic books; as if one should know or that it is some form of black art (excuse the pun).


David.
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Old 9th September 2009, 08:57 AM
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As one who has, over the years, tried almost every shade, and colour, available between black and white, I have settled on off-white as the best general finish to show of monochrome prints.

When I printed in colour I usually tried to find a complimentary mount colour, and usually failed.

For our forthcoming exhibition I have selected narrow aluminium frames, because I think that they are the most unobtrusive. Together with off-white mounts I feel that they show off our prints to best advantage.
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Old 9th September 2009, 09:04 AM
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You wife is correct framing and mounting to suit the image is most important. My wife is arty too and each of my daughters have done fine art degrees and one now teaches art, so I get 'advised' all the time on my presentaion techniques! But when it comes to exhibitions and panel work etc it is nice to see a uniform approach, although not strictly necessary, but this does seem to to be normal in my experience. For some reason the black edged frame is very popular when displaying mono prints, and mostly I would agree this is so, but I have successfully displayed and sold mono prints in silver / alliminium edged frames, plain wood and a variety of stained finished edged frames and even plain wood lime- washed frames. Beach shots look especially good in plain wood or lime-washed frames. The same goes with the choice of mount board - select one that suits the subject and the message you are trying to gert across but I usually stick to the whites and sometimes use the creams. Like most things in art - there is no exact answer to this one!

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Last edited by B&W Neil; 9th September 2009 at 09:07 AM.
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Old 9th September 2009, 09:14 AM
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When we have bought prints and watercolours we have invested quite a lot of time (and money) in choosing the mounts and frames – we always seem to end up with the most expensive option! When it comes my own photos I haven’t had that many framed, but would tend towards something plain and simple for something that I was going to hang on my wall. My local framer offers a plain wood frame that he will stain to match the darkest tone of the image – very handy for lith and toned prints. I’ve only used this once for a lith print that we bought, but it seemd to work well and the recipient was pleased with the result.
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Old 9th September 2009, 09:16 AM
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I now standardise my mounting and framing of b&w prints. Mounts are off white conservation board and thin black (called pearl) aluminium frames from Nielson.

I have seen some very nicely displayed b&w prints in dark wood (square profile) frames.

You'll find a lot of galleries displaying photography will insist on standardisation
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Old 9th September 2009, 10:28 AM
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Got to go with the general consensus here; white/off white and unobtrusive black frames semms to to give less offence for B&W prints. Coloures mounts for prints seems to be pretty much of a no-no in photography.
Agree with Trevor about galleries requiring standardisation, too.
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Old 9th September 2009, 10:52 AM
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Two factors here I think. In an exhibition environment it's the picture that should be prominent, and neither frame nor mount should intrude, just quietly complement the photograph. In the home the frames, and mount must compliment both the picture and room décor.
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Old 9th September 2009, 11:56 AM
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Some times I wonder about things that seem to be an accepted standard, which got me thinking about this subject. Especially when, as I said, there does not appear to be very much discussion about framing – lots of do this or do that when it comes to film and paper but….. Maybe I have not looked in the right books!

Odd that galleries expect imaginative? framing when it is an 'art gallery' but some how not photography.

I tend to use the same thin satin black wood frame (when I can get them here!) but do change the overall size of mount. At present I am having fun going through negatives to see how small I can print them, but still hold interest in the image. In my minds eye they look better in a large mat with plenty of depth below the image. But we shall see…….

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Old 9th September 2009, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daud View Post
SNIP; At present I am having fun going through negatives to see how small I can print them, but still hold interest in the image. In my minds eye they look better in a large mat with plenty of depth below the image. But we shall see…….

David.
Couldn't agree with you more David.
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Old 9th September 2009, 06:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trevor Crone View Post
Couldn't agree with you more David.
Same here - I used to do everything to 12x16 a few years back but now I realise how some subjects work large and others small - or even another abstraction of size and shape. I just wish more paper suppliers would cut to the 10x14 size which is now my favourite sized paper. It is also a tad cheaper

Neil.
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