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  #31  
Old 18th May 2020, 08:10 PM
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skellum skellum is offline
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By coincidence someone over on the LF Forum has recently been looking for infrmation but his Tri-colour camera. A big old beast which uses beam splitters to direct light through filters to 3 separate sheets of film to give simultaneous colour separation negatives.


The original Technicolour process for cinematography used a truly monstrous camera which did a similar trick to shoot 3 strips of film simultaneously, again one for each primary colour.
A few years ago I as lucky enough to see a newly struck print of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, and the colour was utterly stunning.


ps- This has wandered some way from the original post. Sorry
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  #32  
Old 18th May 2020, 11:47 PM
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Hi Mike

You're right - I've been following her emulsions and was intrigued by her results - the hybrid aspect never even occurred to me. Sorry about that.

Regards
Dave
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  #33  
Old 23rd May 2020, 11:39 PM
Stocky Stocky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PanFrank View Post
Well, Imagon lenses are of course excellent for trying different grades of diffusion. Though I know only of Imagons for large formats.
I never tried this, but once read about the advice to cover the lens with a stretched piece of lady stockings. At least cheap enough to try.
There was a 120mm Imagon. I have one that someone has mounted on a focusing mechanism (probably from another old German tele lens) and I can use it with my Nikon SLR using a LTM to Nikon adapter. The focus scale distances are not correct but focus through the viewfinder is fine. The mount's range is such that it would suit other SLRs and still give focus at infinity.

Of course the suggestion to try diffuser or soft focus attachment is much more rational, at least to start with. I mentioned it only because the OP has a Mamiya for which several soft focus lenses can be used (off the shelf, not cobbled together).

Using the black stocking diffuser in enlarging spreads the darkness, not the highlights, so maybe not always the best for portraits, but can give effective moody effects with other subjects.
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  #34  
Old 26th May 2020, 10:42 PM
JOReynolds JOReynolds is offline
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Originally Posted by Richard Gould View Post
2 ways that I have done this over the years, In camera. stretch black stocking over the lens, you can vary the amount of diffusion by varying the amount of tension of the stocking, the tighter the less diffusion, in the darkroom, you can also use stocking, cut the leg off your wife.s/girlfriends tights, but for the best results it must be dark.
I still have the frame of a enlarging diffuser which I made by bending plastic-coated coathanger wire into a 90mm ring, with a handle like a frying pan. I folded back the excess handle wire to make the handle 2-dimensional, so it could be turned. I covered the ring with double-sided tape and stretched black tights material over it. The advantage of having a separate diffuser is that you can vary the proportion of exposure with and without it, without risk of jogging the lens. You can increase the effect by turning the diffuser at an angle with respect to the optical axis. More I recently removed the cloth and used the frame to support some cotton wool for a particularly difficult dodging job. That's a problem because it's now in pieces, my girlfriend became my wife, she no longer wears tights and the women's clothes shops are in lockdown.
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  #35  
Old 26th May 2020, 11:10 PM
JOReynolds JOReynolds is offline
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Originally Posted by Stocky View Post
There was a 120mm Imagon. I have one that someone has mounted on a focusing mechanism (probably from another old German tele lens) and I can use it with my Nikon SLR using a LTM to Nikon adapter.
In the early 1960s Martin Forscher at Professional Camera Repair in New York City put a 120mm Rodenstock Imagon into a simple Kodak focusing barrel for Horn-Griner. It was used on a Hasselblad 1000F, modified to synch electronic flash.
The donor in the 120mm Imagon conversion that I handled was a 120mm Zeiss S-Planar in a Synchro-Compur 500C barrel. Such were the fees charged by top New York photographers in the sixties that the conversion was paid for by the first job that used it.
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