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  #1  
Old 7th November 2016, 10:27 AM
Slixtiesix Slixtiesix is offline
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Default Rodagon WA 60/4

Here is the problem: The maximum print size I can currently achieve with my Kaiser enlarger is limited to 12x12. To achieve a larger print size, I see two options: Using a taller column or buying a wide-angle enlarging lens. I already have a tall column (150 cm) which I bought some time ago, but the vibrations do concern me and I will need to add a wall mount for proper use. In this case, I would keep my 80/5,6 Rodagon or may upgrade to an Apo-Rodagon somewhen in the future.
The other solution would be to buy a Rodagon WA 60/4. This should give me a print size of roughly 18-19. Since both the wall mount and the WA-Rodagon will cost about the same and drilling the column to the wall means additional work, my question is:

How does the Rodagon WA 60/4 compare to the normal 80mm Rodagon or even the APO-Rodagon? I intend to use this lens for 6x6.
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Old 7th November 2016, 12:10 PM
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monst monst is offline
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i think this sometimes depends on the space you have between the column and the easel you use, it does limit how big you can go especially if you have a beard easel with the huge borders.
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  #3  
Old 7th November 2016, 12:34 PM
John King John King is offline
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Default Rodagon lenses

All Rodagon lenses in my experience are very very good.

However a wideangle lens would not be as good as a standard lens for the format. I use a 50/2.8APO and an 80/F4 non APO and both are as good as each other. Although the APO lens is reputedly better than a 'normal lens, I use my 80mm for both colour and B&W and cannot see any difference up to 12x16.

With a W/A lens it may come down to how sharp you want the corners to look from close up. From a normal viewing distance it would not make one jot of difference.

I prefer wall mounted enlargers and intend to do exactly that with my LPL7700 during the refurbishment. If you are capable of fixing a shelf to a wall, then making your own wall mount is relatively simple.

All you need are two metal right angle shelf brackets, a piece of 10mm plywood about 6x4", and a smaller right angle bracket to secure the top of the column in an absolutly verticle position in all planes. You will also need a power drill, accurate spirit level, wall plugs and screws. Plus a bit of ingenuity. The column of the enlarger can be placed as close to, or within reason as far away as you wish from the wall, simply by adjusting the base position of the enlarger on the plywood or on the upper wall brackets.

The total cost should not come to more than 10

Last edited by John King; 7th November 2016 at 12:41 PM.
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  #4  
Old 7th November 2016, 01:38 PM
Tony Marlow Tony Marlow is offline
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I had the same problem and bought the Rodagon WA 60 mm lens and it appears to me to match the 80 mm schneider Componon and Rodagon for quality up to 16 x 12. It is also easier to reach the focusing knob on my Kaiser. Maybe there is a difference between theory and acceptable practice and how critical your eye is?

Tony
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Old 7th November 2016, 04:06 PM
John King John King is offline
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When I said I cannot see any difference up to 12x16, in fact I don't print any larger because I cannot process the paper. I can enlarge over 12x16; in fact a gnats whisker over 16x20 and take a crop from somewhere in the frame. However as the image section from the resulting crop will be passing through the central section of the optic, the difference will be unmeasurable away from an optical test bench. In addition As I am using 6x4.5 with my medium format, I would probably get away with a 60mm, but simply I don't need anything else.
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Old 7th November 2016, 04:45 PM
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Martin Aislabie Martin Aislabie is online now
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If you look at the MTF curves for wide angle enlarging lenses they match those of a conventional enlarging lens - so there should be not different in the quality of your finished print.

I've attached the Rodenstock achieve file for their enlarging lenses.

Regarding over-size prints - there are 2 possible alternatives.

Firstly, you can rotate your Kaiser Enlarger head through 90 degrees and project an image on to a wall - or at least you can with mine (VP9005)

Alternatively, you might be able to lift the whole enlarger column out of the baseboard and rotate it through 180 deg - and so allow you to project prints down onto the floor.
I have never checked doing this with my Kaiser - but I've done it in the past with a Durst and cannot see a company like Kaiser missing a similar feature.
You have to place some serious counterweights on to your baseboard to stop the whole thing toppling over

If you floor project or go for a super long column - you will need to be mindful of the distance between the enlarger head and the column

On the other hand - I understand the lure of buying new bits of kit too.

Martin
Attached Files
File Type: pdf rodenstock_enlarging_lenses_e_2281.pdf (481.5 KB, 27 views)
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  #7  
Old 7th November 2016, 05:29 PM
Slixtiesix Slixtiesix is offline
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Thank you so much Martin! This datasheet was very reassuring. From what I can see when looking at the MTF-data is that the Rodagon WA is almost as good as the APO-Rodagon N. The only difference is that one has to stop down the Rodagon WA one or two additional stops to gain the same resolution and light fall-off. These are 40/50mm lenses, but I dont see why it should be significantly different for the 60/80mm.

I know about the feature of the Kaiser enlargers to rotated the head and turn the column. However, I would have to re-align the enlarger every time I do this and Im looking for a more permanent solution.
I think I will start to look out for the Rodagon WA and maybe I can get one for a reasonable price...
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Old 8th November 2016, 01:03 PM
Svend Svend is offline
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If don't want to buy another lens and you're handy with a saw and drill and have some scrap lumber lying around, you could build an extension for your column to lift it higher off the baseboard. I did this for my old Beseler 23CII which had a std. ht. column and could only get 11x14 on the baseboard. I built it out of 3/4" ply in form of a sort of long box open on two sides and braced in the middle. One side of the box was bolted to the baseboard, the other side bolted to the column. It added about 8" or so to my column height. Worked great. If you want to try this then let me know and I'll give you a couple of tips, such as angling the box so you don't run out of baseboard space to the rear, etc....

I had first tried wall projection and then floor projection, as Martin suggested, but alignment was a nightmare for both arrangements, and focusing was impossible on the floor -- only an Orang-utan could manage that. One advantage of the column extension is that you can still easily move or stow the enlarger when not in use, without having to unbolt it from a wall mount. OTOH, if you never move it, then a wall mount is perhaps a better option - more solid.

Good luck.

Svend

Last edited by Svend; 8th November 2016 at 01:12 PM.
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  #9  
Old 9th November 2016, 06:45 PM
Slixtiesix Slixtiesix is offline
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One more question: Could it be that there was also a "normal" 60/4 Rodagon that did not cover 6x6 but only 35mm/4x4?
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  #10  
Old 9th November 2016, 09:53 PM
alexmuir alexmuir is offline
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Default Rodagon WA 60/4

It appears from the chart that there was one for 4x4 negatives. The wide-angle enlarger lenses from Rodenstock tend to have 'WA' inscribed on the barrel as part of the description. If it doesn't say WA, then I would assume it to be a normal formula for the appropriate film format.
Alex.

Last edited by alexmuir; 9th November 2016 at 10:00 PM.
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