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Old 9th January 2021, 04:23 PM
Paul Walding Paul Walding is offline
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Default Which alternative processes are popular in the UK, and why?

Several years ago I posed the question, 'is anyone out there doing chrysotypes?' in the hope of finding someone to compare notes with, but it would seem that the answer was probably, no.

So, perhaps, it would be interesting to widen the question and ask which of the various processes are you using and why; is recreating particular bygone technique in itself worthwhile, do you like the resulting print, or is the process determined by the availability of chemicals/kits/equipment?

I have enjoyed producing cyanotypes, argyrotypes and a few chrysotypes having spent ages acquiring and learning about the necessary bits. These processes I gravitated to by ease of use and cost in the case of the cyanotype and results (less blue!) with the latter two of which the chrysotype can, I think, give the nicest image. Of the processes that I have considered but rejected; gum bichromates would be great but for having to use dichromates and in the case of platino/palladiotypes, the chemicals are available in the USA but not in the UK.

What has influenced your choice?
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Old 9th January 2021, 05:39 PM
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MartyNL MartyNL is offline
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Time is my greatest restriction due to work and family. I'm lucky and very pleased if I'm able to do some regular gelatin silver printing.
I've got everything in order to do some liquid emulsion printing and I'm cyanotype curious.
Most of all, I'd like to dip my toes but not literally , into first dry plate and then wet plate before trying platinotypes.
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Old 9th January 2021, 06:46 PM
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CambsIan CambsIan is offline
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I've just started on cyanotype in last couple of days.

Ian
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Old 9th January 2021, 07:17 PM
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Rob Archer Rob Archer is offline
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I've dabbled (again, not literally!) with cyanotypes in the past but plan on doing it a bit more seriously, starting with setting up a more consistent light source than sunshine.
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Old 9th January 2021, 09:48 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Haven't tried any so far but bromoil at least seems to have enough practitioners to have a website and puts on courses

I may be completely wrong but some of the other alternative processes may count the real/experienced practitioners in double figures only

Mike
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Old 10th January 2021, 12:35 PM
Quendil Quendil is offline
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I hope to try quite a few once I get a darkroom setup. Not sure why perhaps its similar to the chemistry set I had as a child.

David
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Old 10th January 2021, 02:44 PM
Terry S Terry S is offline
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Default Are making chrysotypes an easy process for beginners?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Walding View Post
Several years ago I posed the question, 'is anyone out there doing chrysotypes?'

I have enjoyed producing cyanotypes, argyrotypes and a few chrysotypes having spent ages acquiring and learning about the necessary bits. These processes I gravitated to by ease of use and cost in the case of the cyanotype and results (less blue!) with the latter two of which the chrysotype can, I think, give the nicest image.
Paul, I have read a lot about all the various processes, and after years of trying, I am slowly becoming happy with my b/w darkroom printing. This has meant that I am now happy, along with a few others on this forum, to dip my toe into the Cyanotype pond.

I had never heard of chrysotypes before, but just looking them up, gold seems to be the metal used to produce them. With cost in mind, I was about to give up straight away. But continuing onto other sites, the newer process, the 'Texas chrysotype' was starting to be mentioned, with people saying that it was both cheap and easy to do. And from what I can tell from what I've read, there seems to be only two cheap chemical ingredients required, being citric acid and ammonium ferric oxalate, with the latter seeming to be widely available from a number of UK chemical companies (but only one US seller on ebay).

But then, on one or two of the sites it says that gold (although a very small amount, but still some gold) is also required.

So now I'm a bit confused. Do I need just the two ingredients I've mentioned above or do I also need (a small amount of) gold as well? And also, just as important, is it an easy process that it is proclaimed to be?

I like the look of the prints I've seen on the web, but will be bookmarking some chrysotype sites for now, but hope to return to it in the future, when I've read a bit more about it.

So, in the meantime, has anyone else, other than the OP, used this process and if so, what are your thoughts for a total beginner?

Terry S
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Old 9th March 2021, 06:40 PM
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I think there a LOT of folks who make Cyanotypes in the UK.

I, just this January, began learning to Salt Print.

Both Nik & Trick and Process Supplies have some limited chemistry, but wetplatesupplies.co.uk have an extensive stock.

I've been using Bergger COT320 paper, but shall likely look at something a bit cheaper when my last few sheets run out. Not because it is not any good - probably one of the best papers available, just not cheap and for learning a bit too much so really.

PL/Pd chemistry is available in the UK - again not cheap though. I'm not at the 'toning' stage for anything yet, but both Moersch and Tetenal make a Gold Toner that is not excessively expensive or you could make up your own I believe.

I use 95% digital negatives, in my case, from various format film negatives that have been scanned. I am also beginning to use my 4x5 to make sufficiently dense negatives that are required for Salt Printing - much, much more dense than those required for silver gelatin prints.

My two main books are:

Salt prints - Peter Mrhar
Primitive Photography - Alan Greene

The alternativephotography.co.uk website is invaluable as a resource.
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Old 10th March 2021, 12:13 PM
Terry S Terry S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by longhouselife View Post
I've been using Bergger COT320 paper, but shall likely look at something a bit cheaper when my last few sheets run out. Not because it is not any good - probably one of the best papers available, just not cheap and for learning a bit too much so really.
Can I recommend that you read the thread on here about peoples experiences with cyanotypes, but most importantly which papers they decided to use. Many experiments were made and papers were found that were, as you say, not too costly but work well with the process. I think that just one or two papers were agreed as filling all criteria quite quickly. It's a long set of posts, but definitely worth reading:

http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...ad.php?t=13447

I have also been reading up on the Chrysotype process again, but most importantly a more recent version called the 'Texas Chrysotype', which is supposed to be easier, as it requires less chemical mixes. But, you require just 1gm of 'tetrachlorauric acid', which I believe is also needed in the original process. A quick browse tells me that this will cost £104.00 plus p/p - so it's a VERY expensive process to try, even when not including other items, so I will regretfully give this one a miss, at least for now!

Terry S
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