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  #11  
Old 29th October 2017, 11:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike O'Pray View Post
I take John that as they are not listed you have to phone them and ask for them? I like the idea of the option of having them already coded. Handy for bulk rolls if you have a camera that cannot input the ISO independently

Good info for most of us but just a pity that Roy is about 7 thousand miles away. A quick and cheap call from the state of Washington on the west coast of the U.S. to Mansfield in the U.K. is probably not really an option.

Mike
Thanks for your concern, Mike! Actually I can make phone calls very cheaply to the UK but I still intend to try your other suggestion first (i.e. reusing the film manufacturers' cassettes).
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  #12  
Old 30th October 2017, 09:35 AM
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Emailed Peter Moore at Morco this morning, he replied that they no longer have the film cassettes in stock but he will let me know if they get some in the future. I re-use my 35mm cassettes, the secret is to use a strong thin tape. I use thin brown plastic parcel tape. I tried using masking tape but when it came to auto rewind sometimes the tape prevented the film from going back into the cassette. I dx code my film cannisters by scratching off the paint squares and applying black tape over the appropriate areas to negate the electrical contacts, see, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DX_encoding. Beware of the space that denotes how long your film is 36 exposures or 24. Some cameras auto rewind when they feel the tension on the film when it comes to its end, some rewind by reading the DX code. I do not use bulk loaded films in auto rewind cameras as I have had problems, one compact I had broke the clutch on the rewind spool because the tape stopped the film from rewinding. I have also had the film pull off where I have joined films with poor adhesive tape. Also cut your film between sprocket holes and tape both sides of the film and check that it slides freely in and out of the cassette.
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  #13  
Old 30th October 2017, 11:32 AM
John King John King is offline
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Default Re-loading cassettes

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Originally Posted by GoodOldNorm View Post
Emailed I do not use bulk loaded films in auto rewind cameras as I have had problems, one compact I had broke the clutch on the rewind spool because the tape stopped the film from rewinding. I have also had the film pull off where I have joined films with poor adhesive tape. Also cut your film between sprocket holes and tape both sides of the film and check that it slides freely in and out of the cassette.
It is relatively easy to get around this. When you attach the film to the spool, make sure you have enough tape to go around the spool with two 'tails' about 1.5" long. Basically if you imagine the tape in a 'U' shape with the spool in between. Fit the film under the side nearest you and the other 'tail' attach the the emulsion side. This is now very secure and ensures the last 1/2" of film does not come out of the cassette.
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  #14  
Old 30th October 2017, 11:42 AM
Richard Gould Richard Gould is online now
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Firstcall do reloadable cassettes, theirs are the Imago range, made out of Coconut wood, thogether with bik loaders and of course film
Richard
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  #15  
Old 30th October 2017, 12:18 PM
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[QUOTE=John King;116711]It is relatively easy to get around this. When you attach the film to the spool, make sure you have enough tape to go around the spool with two 'tails' about 1.5" long. Basically if you imagine the tape in a 'U' shape with the spool in between. Fit the film under the side nearest you and the other 'tail' attach the the emulsion side. This is now very secure and ensures the last 1/2" of film does not come out of the cassette.[/QUOTE

]Hello John, I assume this method is for when you are using the re-loadable cassettes.I have only used old film cassettes and attatched my new film to the short piece of film already attatched to the spool.

The main advantage of DIY loading for me is being able to load a few 12 exposure films. Doing this can reduce your spool length because you use up your bulk film with lengths of film leader to make the short films. The best way for economy is to wind 18 x 36 exposure films best done whilst watching your favourite TV programes.
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  #16  
Old 30th October 2017, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
Check out Shirley-Wellard labyrinthine cassettes. British made and slightly complicated; but they do come up on eBay. Message me if you can't find instructions for them online.

They are a bit like Leica cassettes, which I also use but which work properly in Leicas only.
Thanks for that suggestion.
Somehow, I cannot get comfortable with the idea of using a relatively expensive cassette. I use a mail order processing service here in the US and though the processing itself is very good the company in the recent past has certainly misunderstood my instructions to return my cassettes.
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  #17  
Old 30th October 2017, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodOldNorm View Post
Emailed Peter Moore at Morco this morning, he replied that they no longer have the film cassettes in stock but he will let me know if they get some in the future. I re-use my 35mm cassettes, the secret is to use a strong thin tape. I use thin brown plastic parcel tape. I tried using masking tape but when it came to auto rewind sometimes the tape prevented the film from going back into the cassette. I dx code my film cannisters by scratching off the paint squares and applying black tape over the appropriate areas to negate the electrical contacts, see, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DX_encoding. Beware of the space that denotes how long your film is 36 exposures or 24. Some cameras auto rewind when they feel the tension on the film when it comes to its end, some rewind by reading the DX code. I do not use bulk loaded films in auto rewind cameras as I have had problems, one compact I had broke the clutch on the rewind spool because the tape stopped the film from rewinding. I have also had the film pull off where I have joined films with poor adhesive tape. Also cut your film between sprocket holes and tape both sides of the film and check that it slides freely in and out of the cassette.
Many thanks for all that good info! As I said in my initial posting, my main concern has been with the snap-on ends for the reloadable cassettes not sitting reassuringly. I think I may have been a bit rough when loading the cassettes in the dark, and thereby distorted the shape of the cassette bodies. I have had no tape-related concerns.

Now this information, about the potential for auto-rewind problems, has really made me nervous! I have recently purchased two Chinon CP-9AF cameras. I did so because I had acquired, very cheaply from a thrift store (charity shop), a Chinon CG-5 that I really liked. The CP-9AF's are another kettle of fish altogether! They are much more complicated in functionality but my main concern has been with the auto-rewind function, something that I have little previous experience of. I still don't fully understand when I have reached the end of a cassette that I have loaded myself. The manual says that the display should blink but (I may be mistaken) that does not seem to happen consistently. On a couple of occasions the frame count has reset itself to "0" for no apparent reason. Yet, I could carry carry on making exposures. I have no idea of whether I have thereby made many double exposures.
So this comment you made about auto-rewind problems has made me doubly apprehensive.
The adhesive tape I have successfully used with reloadable cassettes is Scotch Magic tape. It seems very strong and up to the job. However, I note, gratefully, your comment about cutting the film between the sprocket holes makes a lot of sense. I had not thought of that.

Fortunately, on the CP-9AF one can avoid the DX-coding problem by setting the ISO manually so I have no concerns on that score.
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  #18  
Old 30th October 2017, 04:46 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Roy, all you can do is give it a go. While I had auto-rewind issues with my camera and plastic re-loadable cassettes, I have never experienced it with used factory cassettes to which I attach the bulk roll film.

Mike

ochoth
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  #19  
Old 30th October 2017, 07:56 PM
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The occassional problem I have had with rewinding has been with 35mm compact cameras. Once it was the joining tape that snagged and stopped the camera from rewinding the film into the cassette. Another time I had not made a perfect joint.

A lot of compacts do not like coming to the end of the film whilst trying to wind on to the next frame, the camera just keeps trying to wind on to the next frame regardless. (I have had film snapped or pulled out of the cassette). Some cameras detect the film has ended through the tension on the drive and just rewind. I think the problem can occur because some compact cameras use the DX coding to determine the length of the film (24 exposures or 36 exposures). If you have loaded a length of film that does not match the length indicated by the DX coding on the cassette, ( a length shorter than the camera reads) the camera tries to wind on. Not good for the camera! Thats why I only use self loading films in cameras that have a manual rewind option. You can of course load cassettes with 38 exposures or 26 exposures as insurance, but then you may waste one or two frames if the camera auto rewinds at its programed setting, that could be 37 frames or 25 frames. I have had some cameras expose 39 before rewinding. Please do not ask me which cameras auto wind on regardless and those that do not I have too many compacts to remember. The camera that broke was a Samsung 1150 which I replaced with an Ebay purchase costing less than 10. If I was loading cassettes for auto rewind cameras I would go down the route of making sure your film is longer than the DX code on the cassette. Make sure your film counter on your bulk film loader is accurate and wind onto 26exp or 38exp. as required. For manual cameras you can load any length you like up to 38exp. because you can tell by the resistance on the wind on lever that you have reached the end of your film.
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  #20  
Old 30th October 2017, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike O'Pray View Post
Roy, all you can do is give it a go. While I had auto-rewind issues with my camera and plastic re-loadable cassettes, I have never experienced it with used factory cassettes to which I attach the bulk roll film.

Mike

ochoth
Cheers, Mike! I think once I have got back my processed films (for the Chinon CP-9AF cameras) I shall know how I'm doing.
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