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  #1  
Old 24th August 2010, 09:02 PM
Hughes Hughes is offline
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Default Mono Exposure using Filters

From starting out using a 35mm point and shoot Canon! I realise that I have been complacent on correct exposure. eg a K8 registers just a half stop difference with TTL metering but the filter factor reads 1.5 stops! The advice is test and so far I find 2/3rd - 1 stop max. Not so good news for all who are trying to be within 1/3 stop!
As this weather is preventing further testing, any further experiences you'all
many thanks, Hughes.
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Old 24th August 2010, 10:03 PM
Alan Clark Alan Clark is offline
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Unscrew the filter, take a TTL reading without it, screw the filter back on, and take the picture. If it is still there!
Alternately, leave the filter on, use a hand-held meter and adjust by the filter factor.. If you are doing all or most of the photography with the same filter on, simply adjust the ISO of the hand- held meter to match the filter-factor.

Alan
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Old 24th August 2010, 10:29 PM
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I shoot in black & white pretty much exclusively nowadays, and use all the various filters for mono, ie. yellow, orange, red and green.

My own tests have shown my TTL meter will read correctly with a yellow filter attached (which requires 1 stop). However with the red filter on (an additional 3 stops), it will underexpose by around a stop and a half if you set the camera accordingly. If I wish to use this filter, I can just take the meter reading with it on the lens, and then whatever reading the camera indicates, I increase manually by the required amount.

Alternatively, as Alan has mentioned, you could meter without any filter and then increase the exposure accordingly with the filter attached.
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Old 25th August 2010, 04:54 PM
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Thanks to Carl & Alan, but I think Alan has missed the point a little. Why then is the Horsman Film plane meter on a 5/4 only advising to adjust 1/2 stop! for a K8, When manually one would take the advice on the filter rim 3 X 1.5 or 1 1/2 stops! What zone equates to Yellow 8?- 4.5 ?
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Old 25th August 2010, 07:49 PM
Alan Clark Alan Clark is offline
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Hughes,
I am afraid you have lost me..
Alan
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Old 25th August 2010, 09:24 PM
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I have always found that meters are easily confused by filters.
I therefore meter without a filter attached. I then fit the filter and add the extra stops required for the particular filter being used.
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Old 25th August 2010, 10:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hughes View Post
Why then is the Horsman Film plane meter on a 5/4 only advising to adjust 1/2 stop! for a K8, When manually one would take the advice on the filter rim 3 X 1.5 or 1 1/2 stops! What zone equates to Yellow 8?- 4.5 ?
I'm a little unsure with regards to your last question about what the zone equates to. I think what Alan was trying to say was if you know your filter requires 1 additional extra stop and you were using, say, 100 ISO film for example, then you could set your hand held meter to 50 ISO and would effectively give you the correct reading when using the filter on your lens.

To be honest with you, I know nothing about the Horsman plane meter, but I do know TTL meters react differently when trying to take readings with a filter attached, particularly with a strong filter which may require 3 or more stops of additional exposure such as a red filter or even a neutral density filter.

Yellow filters generally speaking require 1 stop, or perhaps 1 stop and a half if it's a stronger one. If your meter is only saying you need to add half a stop, then you'd run the risk of underexposing. On my own cameras, they appear to cope well when reading with yellow filters attached - I've made readings with and without the filter attached just to compare. However, with the orange it would underexpose by around half a stop and with the red it would be around one and a half stops if I were to set the camera accordingly.

Perhaps it may be worth actually doing some test shots with the filter attached and going off what the meter is suggesting. Then removing the filter, take the reading and add the filter factor onto your camera settings (one and a half stops in your case) and take the same shot. Once the film is developed, you'd be able to see on the negatives if there's any discrepancy with the meter.
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Old 26th August 2010, 06:58 AM
Dave miller Dave miller is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl V View Post
SNIP!

Perhaps it may be worth actually doing some test shots with the filter attached and going off what the meter is suggesting. Then removing the filter, take the reading and add the filter factor onto your camera settings (one and a half stops in your case) and take the same shot. Once the film is developed, you'd be able to see on the negatives if there's any discrepancy with the meter.
Very sound and eminently practical advice, please let us know how you get on.
I usually change the setting on my exposure meter to take account of the filter factor; and then forget to reset it when I change the filter of film back.
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Old 26th August 2010, 11:44 AM
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Meters are often affected by colour so metering through a filter may not be accurate. My OM cameras routinely reckon a three-stop red filter only needs one stop more exposure. The advice to take a reading without the filter, then adjust for the filter factor, is good.
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Old 26th August 2010, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave View Post
I usually change the setting on my exposure meter to take account of the filter factor; and then forget to reset it when I change the filter of film back.
That's what I do (including the forgetting bit). If I am using ISO 400 film and a red filter, I set my (hand held) meter to ISO 50.

Not quite so simple with a TTL metering system but with a bit of experimenting you should be able to alter the ISO setting or exposure compensation to bring the meter back into giving a correct exposure.


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