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  #1  
Old 3rd March 2021, 04:37 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Default Ferrotyping FB prints

This subject was raised quite recently but may have been part of another thread which covered ferrotyping as well but I cannot remember the thread nor who made the post on ferrotyoping

So in case this thread should ideally be a response to that thread, would the person and or mod feel free to move it

The post I wish to make was simply a link to a very recent Naked Photographer video on this subject which I felt was interesting

Just bear in mind that the cleaning materials and terminology are U.S. based. However plexiglass is as far as I know the same as "perspex" in the U.K.

Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5NMY4r2Obc

I hope it is useful

Mike
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Old 3rd March 2021, 05:35 PM
Terry S Terry S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike O'Pray View Post
This subject was raised quite recently but may have been part of another thread which covered ferrotyping as well but I cannot remember the thread nor who made the post on ferrotyoping

Mike
Mike, I too remembered a post about it and having just done a forum search of just my posts, it seems that there were in fact TWO posts about it:

http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...hlight=glazing

and:

http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...ghlight=canvas

Terry S
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Old 3rd March 2021, 07:47 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Thanks for the info, Terry. If any of the interested participants in those threads remain interested then Greg Davis' video looks almost ridiculously simple by comparison and what's more most of us here on FADU live in a climate that favours Greg's method because the humidity we have is higher

Mike
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Old 4th March 2021, 08:47 AM
Nat Polton Nat Polton is offline
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http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...t=13359&page=2
Another post about glazing.
Cheers.
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Old 4th March 2021, 09:03 AM
MikeHeller MikeHeller is offline
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Interesting. And he really is naked in the darkroom! I remember putting a gloss on prints in the late 60's using a metal plate in a heated flatbed print drier as he describes, because a higher gloss was supposed to be better if prints were then to be used for images in a newspaper. I did not know that this was ferrotyping until this post! The gloss I got was a bit uneven, probably because I did not clean the plate well enough. I also used a drum drier as he described when at university but generally not face against the drum to get the gloss: there was, as I recall, a danger of it sticking.

However, I have since come to prefer the matt/stipple type surface: I generally avoid the glossy RC papers as I find they are too shiny for my prints. But that is a personal choice - PTS from my inadequate 'ferrotyping' in a previous life??

Thanks for posting.
Mike

Last edited by MikeHeller; 4th March 2021 at 09:29 AM.
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Old 4th March 2021, 11:30 AM
Terry S Terry S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nat Polton View Post
http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...t=13359&page=2
Another post about glazing.
Cheers.
Sorry Nat, but that's one of the links that I have already posted.

Terry S
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Old 4th March 2021, 11:53 AM
Nat Polton Nat Polton is offline
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Oops!

Thanks Terry

We live and learn.

Cheers.
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Old 4th March 2021, 04:19 PM
Terry S Terry S is offline
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Well, I've watched the video mentioned in the first post and it was in the usual easy going and helpful format.

It was interesting to see that a bit of (fresh and new) perspex gives the best result, but seeing the results, I may be like the guy in the video, and not particularly like the very high gloss result.

As he says, RC glossy papers give the same result in a much easier way - and even more so if you heat dry them with a purpose made drier or even a hair drier. If you have one of the heated glazing driers, DON'T try out RC prints on it though, or you could end up saying bye, bye to it all.

Interestingly I was given one of the heated driers with a shiny glazing plate and I have it on my list of things to do, to cut and sew a new canvas cover for it (as mentioned in a previous post). I'll give the real shiny look a go, but based on what is said in the video along with my past experience in the 1970's, it may well be just used to dry prints a bit flatter and when I'm in a hurry, with them facing up to the new canvas.

Terry S
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Old 4th March 2021, 07:34 PM
Nat Polton Nat Polton is offline
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I always thought ferrotype was another method of capturing the image.
Putting a glossy finish on a print was always known to me as glazing.
I have found confirmation on the internet.

https://blog.scienceandmediamuseum.o...otype-tintype/

Makes for interesting reading.

Cheers.
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  #10  
Old 5th March 2021, 12:50 PM
Terry S Terry S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nat Polton View Post
I always thought ferrotype was another method of capturing the image.
Putting a glossy finish on a print was always known to me as glazing.
Interesting Nat.

Although I have read a lot of stuff about tintypes, as I would eventually like to have a go, I don't remember any mention of this word to describe it.

And thinking maybe there were two very close spellings for the two totally different processes, I looked it up and apparently it is the same word for both:

fer•ro•type (ˈfɛr əˌtaɪp)

v. -typed, -typ•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to put a glossy surface on (a photographic print) by pressing on a metal sheet (fer′rotype tin`).
n.
2. Also called tintype. a positive photograph made on a sensitized sheet of enameled iron or tin.


Terry S
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