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  #11  
Old 9th April 2021, 02:05 PM
Terry S Terry S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Aislabie View Post
Look at what sort of material your bottles are made of before you try boiling water.

HDPE bottles (No2) might be OK - it depends on what grade of HDPE the bottles were made from.

Martin
I only read your message this morning Martin, after pouring boiling water down a funnel into one of the bottles last night. The bottle survived the ordeal and just checking it has a number 2 on the bottom of it. No less sulphur though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uwe Pilz View Post
I would use / have used such fixer only for paper and only if sulphur amount is not too large.
Thanks Uwe. I think I will discard the two bottles and the relatively small amount of fixer left and as said get some new glass ones.

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Originally Posted by Svend View Post
Terry,

A quick web search turned up this little bit of info:

"Sulfur, particularly in its S8 form, is insoluble in water but dissolves in carbon disulfide, anhydrous liquid ammonia and methylene iodide. It is moderately soluble in...acetone, its solubility increasing with temperature."

But I suppose it can't hurt to go to the cleaning section of your local supermarket and get a cheap bottle of ammonia and try it for a few days.
I've just put some acetone into the bottle and will leave it to soak overnight. Using acetone is bad enough, but I can't imagine what might happen if I try to raise the temperature of it, so it'll be room temperature acetone for this. No sign of immediate removal.

As for the ammonia, I think that I will give that a miss, as the smell of acetone is bad enough, but I really can't stand the smell of ammonia!

Quote:
Originally Posted by billcowan View Post
I use old dish scrubbers...a 3M scotch-brite scouring pad.
A novel idea bill, but one bottle has it at the top of the bottle, with that area being on a slant, so scouring pad and chopstick wouldn't be able to reach the area.

Thanks as always for your suggestions everyone and if I ever discover an easy way to remove it, I'll report back.

Terry S
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  #12  
Old 9th April 2021, 03:43 PM
John King John King is offline
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Default Dissolving sulphur

I think you may have a problem!

I searched on the web for 'dissolving photographic chemical sulphur' and the reply was as follows (Copied and pasted.)

Sulfur (sometimes still spelled "sulphur") is notoriously difficult to dissolve due to its nonpolar nature; even water, the "universal solvent," is not capable of dissolving sulfur. While some nonpolar solvents like toluene can partially dissolve it, the most effective chemical for dissolving sulfur is carbon disulfide. While the actual dissolving process is simple, carbon disulfide is extremely hazardous due to its flammable and chemical toxicity, and extreme care must be exercised when using it.

Ensure that your laboratory space is completely free of flame and extreme heat sources. Turn off any hot plates or burners, and check for any exposed hot surfaces (such as steam pipes); if the surfaces cannot be unheated for a controlled and significant period of time, then you must choose another laboratory space to work in.

Put on a splash apron, gloves, and safety goggles. Place a borosilicate beaker under a fume hood and turn it on. Place the sulfur sample inside the beaker.
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  #13  
Old 9th April 2021, 06:03 PM
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billcowan billcowan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry S View Post
A novel idea bill, but one bottle has it at the top of the bottle, with that area being on a slant, so scouring pad and chopstick wouldn't be able to reach the area.
Terry S
Yes, opening size dependent that is what your baby finger is for; or a curved forcep.
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  #14  
Old 10th April 2021, 06:59 AM
Stocky Stocky is offline
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I have read that sodium thiosulphate is made by dissolving sulphur in concentrated sodium sulphite solutions with heat. That might work, but the heat might have to be prolonged, so it seems too difficult.

But maybe it's not worth the trouble. Replacing the bottles might be the way to go.
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