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Old 8th November 2015, 01:24 AM
DamonEcosse DamonEcosse is offline
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Default Help with identifying film.

Hello there,

I recently bought a Diana f+ camera that came with 8 rolls of 120 film. the problem is that I don't really know much about the film that it has come with. The film did not come in a box so I do not know exactly which film it is. In the future I hope to learn how to develop my own film as getting 120 film developed is pricey and it is hard to find anywhere that does it. So, I would like to find out exactly which type of film it is and to learn about how I should develop it, i.e which chemicals I should use for example. The silver packaging it comes in does have some information;

Konica film
PRO. 400
120-12

I imagine that this film is out of date although I see no date on it. I was also wondering if this will have any major effect on how it turns out. I hope that someone may have some experience of using this film and may be able to provide me with some relevant information. Thank you in advance for any information you may be able to provide.
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Old 8th November 2015, 12:22 PM
DaveP DaveP is offline
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I don't think 120 has been sold under the Konica name for donkeys years, so it will be old, possibly decades old. I'd open one of them to see if there's more info on the backing paper of the roll itself. As a minimum you need to establish if it's C41, E6 or b&w film.
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Old 8th November 2015, 02:16 PM
paulc paulc is offline
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A quick google search would seem to indicate that this is a colour negative film. So I'd suggest shooting one roll and taking to a local minilab and getting it processed as C41.
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Old 8th November 2015, 03:24 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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The name of "Konica Pro 400" suggested that its colour neg film to me and paul's google search reinforces that. I'd go along with paul's advice in that case.

A decent minilab will process it without attempting to do any prints. Once it or you see the state of the developed negs you can decide whether prints are worthwhile

Mike
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Old 8th November 2015, 08:32 PM
JulioF JulioF is offline
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If I am not mistaken you have Konica negative color C-41 process, ISO 400. Open one of the containers so you can verify it.

I shot this film a long long time ago. The sample I shot back then (2 rolls, 120 ) was 10 years expired but it worked fine. Your film is probably 20 or more years old. With luck you should get some fog and color shift, and increased grain. I have no idea of how this film would be after such a long time, and it will depend a lot on how it was kept. Do not expect good results.

If this is your film, you will need a C-41 kit of chemicals for developing. Just as said above, before you buy chemicals, shoot one roll as a test, and send it for development to a C-41 lab, asking just for the negatives. This should not be unduly expensive.
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Old 8th November 2015, 10:35 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Maybe about 10-12 years ago I used Konica Centuria film on a holiday in Malta. I have no idea if your film is the same but I thought that Konica colour film had quite a different colour signature to say Fuji or Kodak. More muted and neutral looking, certainly compared to Fuji Superia

I wasn't a great fan of its colour signature but you may be. If you like it and the negs and prints turn out fine then enjoy it while you can as it exists no more.

Mike
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Old 10th November 2015, 09:18 AM
cndnlfartist cndnlfartist is offline
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I agree with the others, shoot one roll and get it developed locally if at all possible.
If it looks decent ask them to print one or two prints then decide if it's worth the extra expense to print them all or even worth your effort to shoot another roll.
At least with B&W film, it generally gets slower with age.
So if I thought it was 20 years old I would probably shoot it around ISO 100 to compensate.

If it was just 35mm I would just advise you to throw it out. Since I find it gets too grainy when it's that old.
However that shouldn't be as big of an issue with med format unless your doing big prints.
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Old 10th November 2015, 05:48 PM
DamonEcosse DamonEcosse is offline
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Thank you all very much for contributing. I will take your advice and try a roll out and stick it in to be processed only. I have been looking at a scanner so that might be more economical in the long term. I have also been looking at places to learn how to process various types of film but it is baby steps just now as I am only a beginner. Thank you all again for the help.
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Old 11th November 2015, 09:22 AM
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photomi7ch photomi7ch is offline
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Personally I would have them printed as well as there may not much difference in price. Not only that but you get see if there are any problem with the film.

Pictures posted here should be scanned from prints.
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