Support our Sponsors, they keep FADU free:   AG Photographic   The Imaging Warehouse   Process Supplies   RH Designs   Second-hand Darkroom Supplies  

Notices

Go Back   Film and Darkroom User > Monochrome Work > Monochrome Film

  ***   Click here for the FADU 2015/2014 Yearbooks   ***

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 22nd December 2022, 10:25 AM
Sometimes's Avatar
Sometimes Sometimes is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Yorkshire
Posts: 79
Default Stainless Steel Tank and Spirals

Are there any advantages/disadvantages to using stainless steel tanks and spirals?
I am familiar with the loading technique using the back and forth method of plastic spirals but how does it work on stainless steel spirals which appear to have no such motion? Do you just try and shove it on the spool with your thumbs?

The stainless steel tanks are much smaller than 'standard' plastic ones, so I guess they have a smaller capacity of chemicals I guess this will have repercussions on development times?

Thanks.

Stephen
__________________
Stephen
Never waste an opportunity to fill holes in your knowledge - although further holes may result.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 22nd December 2022, 12:57 PM
Michael Michael is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ballinderry Lower, Co. Antrim
Posts: 1,350
Default

Spirals are loaded from the middle. Depending on the design, the film is caught by a spring or engaged on two protrusions. You then hold the film slightly bowed and turn the spiral to wind it. It becomes very easy with practice.

35mm tanks hold 8 US fluid ounces and 120 tanks hold 15. That's about 236ml for the smaller tank. I use Ilfotec HC at 1:32; so 0.25 fluid ounces are easy to measure. No special developing times are needed.

Tank, cover, cap and spiral are all easy to wash and can be dried quickly too.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 22nd December 2022, 01:41 PM
Collas Collas is online now
Friend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 974
Default

These videos should give you some ideas.

https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...eveloping+tank

You can get loading jigs for some. Some of the reels (Hewes, for instance) can be obtained with larger holes in the middle that allow for the use of the Paterson and Jobo centres in plastic tanks, though I've never tried this.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 22nd December 2022, 02:33 PM
Chrisvclick Chrisvclick is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Wales Uk, Gods Garden
Posts: 100
Default

Can load a steel spiral with wet film or spiral. Then of course as said, use less fluid. I have a 35mm and 120 versions. Only downside is they can leak !
__________________
Is there a level below "in the poop" ?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 22nd December 2022, 02:33 PM
John King John King is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: County Durham
Posts: 3,335
Default

I have always had difficulty in loading stainless spirals, it is the strength of the spring in the centre that causes most of the problems.

I still use the stainless tank, but I also have two plastic spirals from old Durst central loading tanks that fit perfectly and are really easy to load because the central loading spring is not too strong. The plastic spirals also have the advantage of maintaining the chemical temperature whereas stainless spirals affect the temperature far more.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 22nd December 2022, 03:29 PM
Michael Michael is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ballinderry Lower, Co. Antrim
Posts: 1,350
Default

I should have recommended Hewes spirals in particular, in my earlier post. There's nothing better.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 23rd December 2022, 09:17 AM
Miha's Avatar
Miha Miha is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Slovenia
Posts: 1,508
Default

I'm using Kindermann tanks and spirals and their dedicated loader as demonstrated in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOF6yti8RMU
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 26th December 2022, 06:00 AM
MattKing MattKing is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Delta, BC, Canada
Posts: 132
Default

My favorite is the third type of design for the 35mm steel reels. Instead of hooks, or a clamp, there is a "C" shaped wire with an opening near the centre of the reel that the end of the film is inserted into. One inserts the end and then pulls down to crimp the film in - simple and easy and reliable.
Steel reels have three main advantages. The tanks require less volume of chemicals when using inversion agitation, the reels work well when damp or the humidity is high, and the 35mm reels at least supply a very distinctive type of auditory feedback when the film is going on to the reel correctly. That latter advantage is mostly negated if you need to use a changing bag.
I can't load the 120 stainless reels no matter what I try - they take two agile and dexterous hands, and I have 1.5 of those. But when not out of practice, I can/could load the 35mm reels easily and quickly - even in a high volume, newspaper darkroom environment under deadline pressures.
I don't use the 35mm reels much any more, because so much of the developing I do is 120, and it is better for me to use the same tanks (Paterson) and reels (AP reels with wide flanges) for all my film. But I always recommend that people consider trying the steel reels, if they are able. I even worked up a way to use continuous rotary agitation with them - and not the Hewes for JOBO tanks version.
The only downside of that approach, is the infernal noise it makes in a metal tank!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	develop.jpg
Views:	120
Size:	46.0 KB
ID:	4623  
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 26th December 2022, 11:34 AM
Martin Aislabie's Avatar
Martin Aislabie Martin Aislabie is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Stratford-upon-Avon, England
Posts: 2,089
Default

I bought a Ilford/Hewes spiral for Ilford HP5 Motordrive - a 72 exp 35mm film - standard HP5 emulsion coated on a thinner film base. An idea Ilford briefly tried in the late 70s.

I found trying to load the film on to the reel a complete and utter PITA.

In addition - when you put the lid on the tank - it leaked in a horrendous way.

I never persevered - and reverted back to Paterson Reels and lost a frame of film by cutting the roll of film when the reel was full - loading the remainder on to a second reel.

I can see there are advantages to stainless steel reels if you are processing very large quantities of film in a dip and dunk machine (as newspapers used to need to do) - as spiral cleanliness is much easier to achieve than with plastic.

However, for ordinary users like me, the hassle wasn't worth the benefit.

YMMV

Martin
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 26th December 2022, 12:38 PM
PanFrank's Avatar
PanFrank PanFrank is offline
Friend
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 683
Default

I use Hewes in Jobo drums, works very well. Though only when I only use 2 reels in a 1 litre drum for semi-stand developing with 1:100.
Reply With Quote
Reply
Support our Sponsors, they keep FADU free:   AG Photographic   The Imaging Warehouse   Process Supplies   RH Designs   Second-hand Darkroom Supplies  

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
35mm and 120 stainless steel spirals vanannan Sale or Wanted 6 2nd May 2019 05:22 PM
Stainless steel dev. tank for 120 Michael Darkroom 5 1st July 2018 11:22 AM
Stainless steel dev. tank for 120 Michael Sale or Wanted 4 16th June 2018 08:23 AM
Hewes Stainless Steel Spirals Andrew Bartram Darkroom 7 2nd November 2016 05:58 PM
Stainless Steel Centre-Load Spirals, 35mm, 120, 220 Roy_H Sale or Wanted 1 27th May 2016 05:14 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions Inc.