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  #1  
Old 10th July 2013, 04:50 PM
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vincent vincent is offline
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Default Changes in water supply

I have just received notice from the council that there will be a change in the water supply to my area. They say that the water will be 'harder' and will result in deposits of limescale in appliances when the water is heated. A light film might may form in heated beverages, but the water is perfectly safe to drink.

What I'm wondering about is how it might effect my making of ID11 and the processing of my films.

Any information or suggestions most welcome.
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Old 10th July 2013, 05:01 PM
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Ian Marsh Ian Marsh is offline
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Not sure as i am no chemist, but to be on the safe side I always use distilled water for mixing all chemicals. here it is sold in supermarkets for about 95 cents for 5 liters. Not sure if it is expensive in Ireland, but may be worth looking into, in UK I used to buy it in the local chemist, but cant remember the price
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Old 10th July 2013, 05:22 PM
Michael Michael is offline
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Vincent - Large parts of Britain have much harder mains water than anything we have in Ireland; so experiences from e.g. London will be relevant.

I had a quick look through Coote and the relevant Ilford fact sheets. No real mention of hard water, which seems good news.
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Old 10th July 2013, 05:51 PM
Alan Clark Alan Clark is offline
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Vincent, I too use ID11, and live in a hard water area. I was getting specks on my negatives, and , blaming the hard water, mixed my next batch of developer with a bottle of Spring water from the supermarket. You know the stuff, "Alpine water from a 10,000 year old glacier. Best before July 15th.... "
I used it to dilute the fixer too, and wash the film. I still got specks on the film.
Next I tried de-ionised water, then rain water from my rain butt, then filtered tap water. All to no avail, with no visible differences to my negatives.
So if I were you I wouldn't worry too much about hard water....

Alan
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Old 10th July 2013, 06:30 PM
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GoodOldNorm GoodOldNorm is offline
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Default Hard water

The only problem I have had with hard water is drying marks on my negs. A rinse in de-ionised or distilled water with Mirasol wetting agent added solved the problem.
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Old 10th July 2013, 07:21 PM
Lostlabours Lostlabours is offline
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As above drying marks will be the only issue, commercial developers are made to cope with variations in water.

Ian
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Old 10th July 2013, 08:08 PM
DavidH DavidH is offline
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I live in a hard water area and have never noticed any adverse effects on the chemicals. I have used ID11, Microphen, Perceptol, Promicrol etc. over the years and in the case of ID11 have made it with distilled water without noticing any difference in developing times.
Regarding de-ionised water, when I was a lab tech in the late 1960s we used to use it, but so far as my dim memory recalls it did not remove the chemicals, only deactivate them. It may be different now, but if not it may make little difference to drying marks. Distilling water on the other hand, removes most of the chemicals.
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Old 10th July 2013, 08:10 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Last time I looked, Vincent, my water, supplied by Anglian Water from its Pitsford reservoir in South East Northants had one of the hardest ratings in England and as this area is all hard water anyway this rating most likely matches or exceeds any hardness in the rest of Britain and yes we do get limescale in kettles etc.

However the good news is that to date I have yet to experience any issue with film development and drying. I use tap water throughout, simply adding the requisite amount of Ilfosol to the final rinse.

I'd be surprised if a change of water in your part of the Republic results in harder water than this area of Northants so I wouldn't worry

Mike
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Old 10th July 2013, 11:01 PM
AlanJones AlanJones is offline
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Default Hard water: Change in you water supply.

Oh dear Vincent! Looks like we are getting close to the great squeegee debate of last year, and also on drying marks earlier on this year!

For starters, it shouldn't cause any difference to any of your chemical solutions such as developers, stops or fixers. But you will need to use a wetting agent and need to have this made up from de-ionised or distilled water. I do this and it works fine with me in our hard water from the chalk downlands. After about a year or 10-12 films later, I chuck it out and start again with a fresh batch. Why is because a certain amount of the contaminants (mineral salts) will be carrier over from the final wash into the wetting agent and this will stop troubles of drying marks before they start. For this water, try the local car spares shop or Poundland.
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Old 10th July 2013, 11:25 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike O'Pray View Post
I use tap water throughout, simply adding the requisite amount of Ilfosol to the final rinse.

Mike
Vincent, forget Ilfosol Try Ilfotol instead. What was I thinking of! I blame excessive consumption of Yorkshire Tea. I use the hard water variety of this tea. Yes we have such hard water that the maker of this tea even makes a special brand of tea to suit. Good stuff but it can affect my cognitive ability.

Mike
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