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  #21  
Old 3rd February 2021, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by mpirie View Post
.....or set your meter to 6 stops below your normal EI......so instead of 400, set to 6, then meter as usual and fit the filter after composing and focussing

Mike
very good idea thanks.
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  #22  
Old 4th February 2021, 09:57 AM
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I have read that the best result with infrared is when you are angled 90 degrees to the sun. do any of you take that into account and or go with the flow.
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  #23  
Old 4th February 2021, 11:42 AM
mpirie mpirie is offline
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Personally, the composition is more important than the IR effect.

So I either have to accept a less-obvious IR effect or return when the sun has moved round.....but that then affects the composition :-)

Mike
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  #24  
Old 4th February 2021, 02:48 PM
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Martin Aislabie Martin Aislabie is offline
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Doesn't the IR effect on foliage depend upon the time of year ?

Martin
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  #25  
Old 4th February 2021, 03:16 PM
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IR shot on overcast or gloomy days is almost pointless. Full sun is best, over the shoulder. Conre-jour can work, but doesn't particularly show it to best effect for some reason. For me, the whole reason to use IR is to take advantage of its unnatural representation of the scene. I like black skies and blazing white foliage, so actively look for scenes which make the most of the film's character. For me it's a summer film.
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  #26  
Old 4th February 2021, 04:19 PM
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Originally Posted by skellum View Post
IR shot on overcast or gloomy days is almost pointless. Full sun is best, over the shoulder. Conre-jour can work, but doesn't particularly show it to best effect for some reason. For me, the whole reason to use IR is to take advantage of its unnatural representation of the scene. I like black skies and blazing white foliage, so actively look for scenes which make the most of the film's character. For me it's a summer film.
I only ever intended to use it in the summer. Like you I want the white foliage and black skies.

I also agree the composition is what counts.
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  #27  
Old 4th February 2021, 06:17 PM
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I have found that you need a fair amount of sunlight to achieve good results, but winter sun can work well. Itís just a matter of waiting for the right day.
The best advice I can give about subject matter/composition, is to be aware of the types of thing that will glow white, and those which will be totally black. Itís easy to see a good composition, but when the film is processed, you realise that your subject has come out white against a white background. Clouds, for example, remain white, so no point in trying to frame a striking conifer against a big, fluffy cloud. I hope that makes sense. I have fallen into the trap of ignoring the background too often with IR.
The other thing to watch is contrast. I have twice taken IR pictures of Lochranza Castle, and on both occasions I ended up with a detailed stone frontage, reflecting all the IR rays, and a completely dense black wall on the adjacent side. In this situation, and against normal practice for buildings, a head-on view would have been better.
Alex.



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  #28  
Old 6th February 2021, 09:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexmuir View Post
I have found that you need a fair amount of sunlight to achieve good results, but winter sun can work well. Itís just a matter of waiting for the right day.
The best advice I can give about subject matter/composition, is to be aware of the types of thing that will glow white, and those which will be totally black. Itís easy to see a good composition, but when the film is processed, you realise that your subject has come out white against a white background. Clouds, for example, remain white, so no point in trying to frame a striking conifer against a big, fluffy cloud. I hope that makes sense. I have fallen into the trap of ignoring the background too often with IR.
The other thing to watch is contrast. I have twice taken IR pictures of Lochranza Castle, and on both occasions I ended up with a detailed stone frontage, reflecting all the IR rays, and a completely dense black wall on the adjacent side. In this situation, and against normal practice for buildings, a head-on view would have been better.
Alex.



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Thank you Alex, I'm filing all this info for when I go out. I am not one for standing around in the cold. I did it one year with my pinhole camera by the time I was finished I could not feel my fingers. fortunately a slow cooked beef curry was waiting when I got home that thored me out very enjoyable
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  #29  
Old 10th February 2021, 02:40 PM
Nat Polton Nat Polton is offline
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A little thing that is probably taken for granted if you know about it.
Infrared focussing.
Focus the lens, then shift the focussed distance shown on the lens to the little red infrared focus marker, just to the right of the main focussing index on the lens barrel.
Infrared focusses at a different point to visible light.

Note.... Not all lenses have this marker on it.

Cheers.
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