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An easy way to develop sheet film
Alan Clark
Alan Clark
28th December 2009
The simplest and cheapest method of developing 5 x 4 sheet film is in an open dish using the "shuffle" method. Its drawback is that it is not easy to load the sheets of film, with wet hands, one at a time, into a pre-bath of water. It also requires some skill to avoid damaging the film...
  #10  
By Keith Tapscott. on 11th January 2010, 11:37 AM
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Personally, I would like to see Paterson Ltd design a series of light-proof trays with dividers and a ribbed base specifically for processing sheet-films of various format sizes.
I`m sure it is well within their capability provided that Large-Format camera users show enough interest in buying such products.
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  #11  
By Alan Clark on 11th January 2010, 03:37 PM
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Thanks Phil,
Good luck to you.

Alan
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  #12  
By Steve Smith on 12th January 2010, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Don't forget the Paterson Orbital!
I think the Orbital is a great design which uses a minimum of solution to work. I couldn't believe it was enough until I tried it with the lid off.

Welcome to FADU Roger. Nice to hear from you again since you disappearerd from APUG.


Steve.
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  #13  
By Keith Tapscott. on 12th January 2010, 11:36 AM
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
I think the Orbital is a great design which uses a minimum of solution to work. I couldn't believe it was enough until I tried it with the lid off.

Welcome to FADU Roger. Nice to hear from you again since you disappearerd from APUG.


Steve.
I agree Steve, but think about having one around the size of a 12x16 inch size print trays that is specifically designed for processing several 4x5 or 5x7 inch films-sheets, two 8x10 inch film-sheets and a single 11x14 inch size film-sheet with a similar pour in-pour out light proof lid.
I think that it would be something worth having, but I don`t know if anyone else thinks the same. If there was enough interest from large-format camera owners, then perhaps Paterson Ltd might consider designing something like it.
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  #14  
By Steve Smith on 12th January 2010, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
I agree Steve, but think about having one around the size of a 12x16 inch size print trays that is specifically designed for processing several 4x5 or 5x7 inch films-sheets, two 8x10 inch film-sheets and a single 11x14 inch size film-sheet with a similar pour in-pour out light proof lid.
I agree. I think your design is good too. I should have said that in my first post!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
If there was enough interest from large-format camera owners, then perhaps Paterson Ltd might consider designing something like it.
Perhaps Steve Smith and his CNC machine could have a go at making one out of PVC!


Steve.
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  #15  
By Bob on 12th January 2010, 03:10 PM
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Have moved Bill's ready-made Slosher post to: http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...2740#post22740

as an option for those without the necessary Blue Peter genes...
Last edited by Bob; 14th January 2010 at 08:29 PM..
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  #16  
By SueJanes on 6th March 2010, 06:44 AM
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Mike, your developing box looks good. My current method uses 1300ml of chemical, so anything that will reduce that is going to be better for me. I happen to have a handy husband, who I am sure will be only too pleased to make me one. Thanks.
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  #17  
By Barry on 8th March 2010, 07:17 PM
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This is also a good option for those using unusual film formats eg whole plate, 7x11... Different tray size and plastic plug layout.
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  #18  
By A Sanderson on 12th March 2014, 11:52 AM
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Alan, you have a novel approach there and I'm sure it is very effective. I often process sheet film one at a time in a tray. If I could offer one bit of advice;
You don't need to worry about the light getting in after processing is complete (development). You can lift the lid once the dev is out and pour the stop, then fix in with the room lights on. There will be no difference in density, because the exposure you are giving it, isn't developed.
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  #19  
By Alan Clark on 12th March 2014, 01:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Sanderson View Post
Alan, you have a novel approach there and I'm sure it is very effective. I often process sheet film one at a time in a tray. If I could offer one bit of advice;
You don't need to worry about the light getting in after processing is complete (development). You can lift the lid once the dev is out and pour the stop, then fix in with the room lights on. There will be no difference in density, because the exposure you are giving it, isn't developed.
This is interesting, and something I wouldn't have thought of or dared to do without endorsement! We are told to fix for twice the time it takes for the fix to clear the negatives. With the lights on it will be easy to time this.

Alan
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