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  #1  
Old 12th February 2017, 10:55 AM
TonyC TonyC is offline
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Default Tetenal slide processing.

Hello all.

I'm hoping yo process a 120 roll of fuji velvia and have purchased a 2.5 litre Tetenal kit.

It's been a few years since I did this and am surprised at how high the processing temperatures are.

Is it possible to reduce the temperature and extend the time?

If anyone has done this I'd really like to have an idea of compensation times.

My thanks in advance.
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Old 16th February 2017, 04:17 PM
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maltklaus maltklaus is offline
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I don't think it's advisable with E6 to lower the temperature since it's a very critical and sensitive process. If it's not recommended in the manual (as it is in the C-41 kit) then I wouldn't do it.
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Old 16th February 2017, 04:48 PM
Richard Gould Richard Gould is offline
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Many years ago Paterson made a kit for E6 that could be used at lower tempertures, and it worked very well, I used it a lot myself, but I believe with Tetenal and other current kits you must stick to the high temperture, unless the instructions tell you that lower temps are ok, and if other chemistry are anything to go by then Tetenal will give you very good instructions, so follow then to the letter
Richard
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Old 16th February 2017, 08:39 PM
JOReynolds JOReynolds is offline
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Default E6 at 24 or 30C

Ilford publishes a time/temperature compensation curve and I found that the longer times work well for adjusted temperatures in B&W and, as has been stated, C41. E6 first developer is a fairly conventional B&W formulation and ought to behave according to the curve. E6 colour developer is to finality, so I would expect good results if agitation is not excessive, which would cause oxidisation and increased Dmin/stain. The curve should be applied to all the other times, of course. The problem with E6 (compared to C41) could be that there is no provision for altering colour or density.
All of the above is theory - I haven't tried E6 at 24 or 30C, but it's worth trying if boredom doesn't set in before the end of what is bound to be a long procedure.
By the way, it's amazing how long it takes for a bucket of tepid water to cool down!
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Old 16th February 2017, 09:55 PM
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Jakecb Jakecb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOReynolds View Post
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By the way, it's amazing how long it takes for a bucket of tepid water to cool down!
Indeed, one has to go out and do something else if only for a while
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Old 19th February 2017, 07:09 AM
DaveP DaveP is offline
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I've developed a lot of E6 with the Fuji Hunt kits and more recently the Tetenal kits. They are designed to run at 38degrees for a reason (I don't know what the reason is!) so my advice is just trust the manufacturers know what they are doing and just stick to the standard instructions. You'll get good results. Once you've nailed that you could look at messing around with the temps and times, but to be honest I can't see why you'd want to!
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Old 19th February 2017, 10:34 AM
TonyC TonyC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveP View Post
I've developed a lot of E6 with the Fuji Hunt kits and more recently the Tetenal kits. They are designed to run at 38degrees for a reason (I don't know what the reason is!) so my advice is just trust the manufacturers know what they are doing and just stick to the standard instructions. You'll get good results. Once you've nailed that you could look at messing around with the temps and times, but to be honest I can't see why you'd want to!
My first roll turned out well but, living in the uk the ambient air is quite cold.
Whilst I'm acclimatised to it I did find my basin of water cooled quite quickly. So the second dev became a bit of a juggling act between agitation and heat replenishment.

Perhaps I'll have a play with my next roll and see what happens.
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Old 19th February 2017, 12:59 PM
DaveP DaveP is offline
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If you can rig up some kids of heating element in your basin (those travel kettle elements?) just to stop it cooling too much you'll be laughing. Or find an old Jobo cpe2 makes it easy.
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Old 19th February 2017, 02:37 PM
Richard Gould Richard Gould is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyC View Post
My first roll turned out well but, living in the uk the ambient air is quite cold.
Whilst I'm acclimatised to it I did find my basin of water cooled quite quickly. So the second dev became a bit of a juggling act between agitation and heat replenishment.

Perhaps I'll have a play with my next roll and see what happens.
Try and get hold of a Nova heate, it is like a fish tank heater, and will bring your water bath up to the required temperture, which shoud then bring your chemistry up to the temps you need,The imaging warehouse, home of Nova is a forum sponsor, and details are on there site
Richard
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Old 19th February 2017, 06:16 PM
John King John King is offline
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Default Nova heater

There is one problem with using a Nova heating element and that is the temp control is not waterproof and is designed to be inserted into an apperture cut in the side of a tank. The seal is the rubber grommet into which the heating element(s) are inserted.

You may have better luck with a fish tank heater but I don't know if they go as high as 38c/100F.
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