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  #11  
Old 22nd December 2011, 09:39 PM
Stocky Stocky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave View Post
Phenidone and Dimezone-S have slightly different molecular structures, but I have no idea if it is sufficient to make a difference. Check them here.
There have been at least 4 commercial versions of phenidone:

Phenidone A, phenidone B, dimezone, dimezone-S.

They are all photographically phenidone. Dimezone-S has the advantages i mentioned above.

I have read confusing opinions about whether they are equivalent weight for weight. Dimezone-S is a slightly heavier molecule (206 instead of 162) so i think a reasonable substitution is to use 1.27g of dimezone-S instead of 1g of phenidone. This is just a guess on my part. Some writers over at pure-silver think a little more is needed. I doubt that it's critical.
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  #12  
Old 22nd December 2011, 11:06 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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[QUOTE=GeorgeGiralt;62216]Helo !
Bromophen undiluted gives so cold tones it's icy !
QUOTE]

Given that Ilford stopped making its CT developer that's an interesting finding. The standard description of it suggests that at 1+3 it gives a neutral to warm effect.

I wonder what makes it so "icy" at stock. Nice that it has this property although at stock it becomes a more expensive developer but versatility is always likely to have a cost, I suppose

Mike
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  #13  
Old 23rd December 2011, 12:31 PM
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Argentum Argentum is offline
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I think the liquid versions of chemicals are often different from the published formulas since they need to be very stable and not prone to oxidation because of the required shelf life. For that reason they will often have additives in them that the published formulas don't.

Also names such as Dektol or PQ Universal are not guarantees of a particular formula. Dektol formula mixed from powder doesn't keep too well and the liquid version of Dektol is supposed to be polymax print developer. i.e. the names of developers sold in liquid form are brand names only and not formulas.
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  #14  
Old 28th December 2011, 11:21 PM
GeorgeGiralt GeorgeGiralt is offline
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Hello !
I've made today 1.25 l of the "brew" Les McLean gave to us.
for me it looks like Bromophen, as far as I can tell from a couple prints.
My main problem was that my carbonate is crystalline and had caked; It took me a long time returning it to powder and mixing it. (I've of course taken into account the 10* H2O embedded into the carbonate to make it crystalline !)
So thanks to all of you !
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  #15  
Old 29th December 2011, 05:46 PM
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keep us posted on how this formula works for you.
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  #16  
Old 29th December 2011, 08:21 PM
GeorgeGiralt GeorgeGiralt is offline
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Argentum,
For what I can tell, the first batch was perfect and the prints looks as expected.
I can't tell the shelf life because I mixed the exact amount for an extended printing session and žit went to the sewer at the end of the session.
I'm quite satisfied with the "brew". My only problem is the Phenidone 0.2 % solution I've made which has returned to deposit at the bottom of the bottle ! (the method I used came from the Darkroom cookbook, and was made in water with a pinch of sodium Metabisulfite). Since, I've learned that I can make a 2% solution using alcohol and keep it "forever".
P.S. : Next year ;-) I plan to print again a print I know very well with it and compare with the original.
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  #17  
Old 30th December 2011, 12:58 PM
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Bromophen was (is?) the primary recommendation for Multigrade Warmtone paper before Ilford introduced their own Warmtone liquid developer, so ID-78 might be closer to Bromophen, but we can never be sure because the formula for Bromophen has never been publicly revealed.
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  #18  
Old 22nd November 2020, 05:51 PM
Lostlabours Lostlabours is offline
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I know it's an old thread but it contains a mistake or two.

Bromophen was originally sold as a replacement for ID-20 PQ, itself a replacement for ID-20 an MQ developer a powder developer. However there were issues with coloour shifts with some paper as it was used and the bromide level increase. It has a greater capacity a longer tray life compared to the original MQ version.

To get around this ID-20 PQ was reformulated as ID-62 adding Benzotriazole in place of half the Bromide, this kept prints neutral. Then the issue was Benzotriazole doesn't dissolve easily so you couldn't sell DD-62 as a powder developer.

Instead it was further reformulated switching from Sodium to Potassium Carbonate and some Sodium Carbonate allowing greater concentration as a Liquid Developer.

Because of the increased warmth noticed in ID-62 PQ this was tweaked to become Ilford ID-78 once sold as a warm tone PQ powder developer. In more recent years that formulae was revived and changed to become a concentrate and is sold as Harman Warmtone developer. It's likely they cut the Bromide in Bromophen to 2g (per litre of stock) otherwiseit would nave been virtually as warm toned as ID78.

The formula Les McLean lists has Sodium Metabisulphte, that's in Part A of Bromophen is just a preservative and forms Sulphite when mixed in solution with Part B. Les lists it to make 500ml which is double the normal strength and that will cause solubility issues.

Ian
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  #19  
Old 22nd November 2020, 07:07 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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I have bought but not yet made up to stock solution, Bromophen, forgetting I admit, George's comment all those years ago about it being so cold as to be icy at stock.

I certainly didn't buy it for its icy qualities so I can only hope that at 1+3 it behaves as Ilford suggests it does which is neutral to slightly warm

Mike
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