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  #21  
Old 17th May 2022, 12:20 PM
big paul big paul is offline
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When hand processing, I only agitate 2 turns every 30 seconds. I don't know how you can get 5-7 turns in 30 seconds, it certainly seems over zealous by my processing standards!
Also, I switch hand positions to alternate the twist direction.
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MartyNL


I am going with Marty ,to aggressive agitation ,when I didn't have my jobo processor ,I used to give 4 inversions in the last 10 seconds of every minute .
good luck..

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  #22  
Old 17th May 2022, 12:32 PM
Stocky Stocky is offline
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Originally Posted by alexmuir View Post
There is one thing that occurs to me, although I may be way off the mark. HC110 original formula is pretty thick. It has to be thoroughly mixed to ensure an even solution. I know this from experience. If it is not completely diluted, you will end up with uneven development. I hope you find a solution. Home developing allows far more control and flexibility than commercial processing.
Alex


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Have a look at this. Similar problem, same developer.

https://www.photo.net/discuss/thread...ative.5528144/
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  #23  
Old 17th May 2022, 12:47 PM
John King John King is offline
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Default Dev problems

When I lived in Yorkshire, the water in my area was a lot harder than where I am now. It was suggested at the camera club I used to belong to that when developing, before starting the development using a reusable syringe (The type sometimes included with colour processing kits) add 1 or 2 drops of wetting agent (no more) into the working developer. This breaks down the surface tension and promotes very even development.

I was using a Jobo processor at the time and set the rotation on the slow setting or you will finish up with a lot of froth.

I still do it occasionally now when I develop a 120 film. I cannot say that it will help you, but it worked for me.
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  #24  
Old 17th May 2022, 03:00 PM
Mike O'Pray Mike O'Pray is offline
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Hi, loganca. When I looked at your problem I had a strong sense of deja vu which stemmed from what I can only describe as a near identical problem from a person called vania on a site called Photrio.

Many members replied there and despite all efforts we were unable to solve it. To cut a long story short vania in the last few days reported that he has solved it by changing his developer from HC110 to ID11 although he was good enough to admit that his lab uses HC110 at 1+47 and when he sent a film there as a test the lab developed film was perfect

OK his light streaks on his negatives were more pronounced that yours and in some negs appeared as parallel lines or lines that were very close to parallel

As on Photrio, we on FADU are offering the same set of possible things to change or check.

Frankly like all the others on Photrio I was completely mystified. He seemed to eliminate all possible causes until he reached success, namely changing his developer from HC110 to ID11 although to muddy the waters further he found that using Ilford's Ilfotec HC which is essentially the same kind of developer as HC110 was equally unsuccessful.
I think a lot wondered about a problem with HC110 which Kodak changed in the last year or but Ilford's equivalent being as bad did tend to eliminate HC110 as the culprit

Frankly all I can say is that with an overview of this other person's lengthy thread ( it started in Feb) I don't think that hoods, pre-wet or no pre-wet etc are likely to have much to do with it

I was stuck for an answer on Photrio as to what "vania " was doing wrong and I find myself in the same situation here

Anyway have a look at Photrio and the thread to which I refer. The problem may not be the same but are certainly remarkably similar even down to the film Tri-X, dilution and the fact that lab developed film is fine
The thread on Photrio is called "Overexposed Lines of Film" It is still "live " as of today. It is by someone who calls himself "vania"

Best of luck and sorry I cannot think of anything that might help other than wondering if you might see something there that may hold the key

Mike
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  #25  
Old 17th May 2022, 04:26 PM
JOReynolds JOReynolds is offline
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The appearance has soft edges, which is confusing, because it could be either optical or chemical. But if the streaks are absent when processed in a dip-and-dunk processor so it has to be chemical.

On reading through all the FADU posts and the links in Photo.net the common thread seemed to be HC110, which is packed as a viscous concentrate and specifies quite short development times, which is a disadvantage because the filling time becomes a significant proportion of the total development time and, for amateurs, there is no need to be impatient. On the other hand, using a one-shot developer is logical, so why not use Rodinal, which offers dev times typically over twelve minutes at 68F?

It takes 35 sec to pour 820mL into a Kindermann 2x120 stainless-steel tank through the light-tight baffle in the lid. That's almost 20% of a 5-minute dev time! Bound to be troublesome...

I was trained in a New York pro lab in the sixties, using Nikor stainless spirals in cages and three-and-half-gallon tanks. I was taught to back-wind 35mm and 120 film, hooking the outer turn of film with my fingers so that the emulsion side of the film was no longer wound tightly against the metal and developer could flow freely over the whole width of the film. I remember being shown the streaks that occurred on E3 and E2 Ektachrome when this procedure was not observed. They were not dissimilar to Logan's.
I have written at length in this forum on how to avoid drying marks. The keywords are: 'froth' and 'dry top clip'.
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  #26  
Old 17th May 2022, 05:27 PM
Svend Svend is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOReynolds View Post
It takes 35 sec to pour 820mL into a Kindermann 2x120 stainless-steel tank through the light-tight baffle in the lid. That's almost 20% of a 5-minute dev time! Bound to be troublesome...
+1 I agree with this.

Logan, if I could suggest a couple of things that would be worth trying:

1. For HC110, try unofficial Dilution H, which is half of Dilution B and doubles the development time. This gives you much more latitude for any inconsistencies brought about by pouring/dumping developer, agitation, etc.. As others have mentioned, any very short development time (around 5 minutes or less) is fraught with risk of uneven development, especially if you're new to home developing and don't have your technique fully nailed yet. Much better to give yourself a bit of leeway and go to 8 minutes or longer.

2. Rather than agitating only for the first 5 seconds of development, try agitating for a full 30 seconds after pouring in the developer. This ensures that the critical first minute of development gets good, thorough, even agitation. I would use this for longer development times only, as if done for a short development time may result in over-agitation. I do this routinely for all my films and it works great...but then I never develop for shorter than 8 or 9 minutes.

Check out this very useful page about HC110 for more info on Dilution H, etc.
http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/

Hope this helps. Best of luck sorting this out.
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  #27  
Old 17th May 2022, 05:57 PM
loganca loganca is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike O'Pray View Post
Hi, loganca. When I looked at your problem I had a strong sense of deja vu which stemmed from what I can only describe as a near identical problem from a person called vania on a site called Photrio.

Many members replied there and despite all efforts we were unable to solve it. To cut a long story short vania in the last few days reported that he has solved it by changing his developer from HC110 to ID11 although he was good enough to admit that his lab uses HC110 at 1+47 and when he sent a film there as a test the lab developed film was perfect

OK his light streaks on his negatives were more pronounced that yours and in some negs appeared as parallel lines or lines that were very close to parallel

As on Photrio, we on FADU are offering the same set of possible things to change or check.

Frankly like all the others on Photrio I was completely mystified. He seemed to eliminate all possible causes until he reached success, namely changing his developer from HC110 to ID11 although to muddy the waters further he found that using Ilford's Ilfotec HC which is essentially the same kind of developer as HC110 was equally unsuccessful.
I think a lot wondered about a problem with HC110 which Kodak changed in the last year or but Ilford's equivalent being as bad did tend to eliminate HC110 as the culprit

Frankly all I can say is that with an overview of this other person's lengthy thread ( it started in Feb) I don't think that hoods, pre-wet or no pre-wet etc are likely to have much to do with it

I was stuck for an answer on Photrio as to what "vania " was doing wrong and I find myself in the same situation here

Anyway have a look at Photrio and the thread to which I refer. The problem may not be the same but are certainly remarkably similar even down to the film Tri-X, dilution and the fact that lab developed film is fine
The thread on Photrio is called "Overexposed Lines of Film" It is still "live " as of today. It is by someone who calls himself "vania"

Best of luck and sorry I cannot think of anything that might help other than wondering if you might see something there that may hold the key

Mike
Thanks for the pointer to the thread on Photrio. It is basically the same thread as was quoted above that was posted on photo.net.

Interesting that I hadn't run across the Photrio thread before because I started a thread about my issue there a while back and I had searched for similar threads before doing so. I guess I missed it somehow.

Anyway, yes, the problem does seem remarkably similar, same developer etc. There were some good suggestions in that thread as there have been here so I have a few things to try during my next few development attempts.
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  #28  
Old 17th May 2022, 06:02 PM
loganca loganca is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svend View Post
+1 I agree with this.

Logan, if I could suggest a couple of things that would be worth trying:

1. For HC110, try unofficial Dilution H, which is half of Dilution B and doubles the development time. This gives you much more latitude for any inconsistencies brought about by pouring/dumping developer, agitation, etc.. As others have mentioned, any very short development time (around 5 minutes or less) is fraught with risk of uneven development, especially if you're new to home developing and don't have your technique fully nailed yet. Much better to give yourself a bit of leeway and go to 8 minutes or longer.

2. Rather than agitating only for the first 5 seconds of development, try agitating for a full 30 seconds after pouring in the developer. This ensures that the critical first minute of development gets good, thorough, even agitation. I would use this for longer development times only, as if done for a short development time may result in over-agitation. I do this routinely for all my films and it works great...but then I never develop for shorter than 8 or 9 minutes.

Check out this very useful page about HC110 for more info on Dilution H, etc.
http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/

Hope this helps. Best of luck sorting this out.
Thanks Svend. I read through the 'covington' site many times while planning my use of HC-110, it's very informative. I do plan on trying Dilution H to extend the development time, I just need to do a bit of math to ensure that I have enough developer in the tank to avoid exhaustion at such high dilution.

I don't think I mentioned this earlier, but I have been using a double-reel tank with an empty reel on top and filling the tank so that it just covers the top reel - so basically I'm making enough chemistry to develop two rolls of 35mm film although I'm only loading one reel, so hopefully Dilution H will allow for enough developer in that case. But I would like to develop two rolls at a time at some point as well without risking exhaustion of the developer.
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  #29  
Old 17th May 2022, 06:07 PM
loganca loganca is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOReynolds View Post
T
On reading through all the FADU posts and the links in Photo.net the common thread seemed to be HC110, which is packed as a viscous concentrate and specifies quite short development times, which is a disadvantage because the filling time becomes a significant proportion of the total development time and, for amateurs, there is no need to be impatient. On the other hand, using a one-shot developer is logical, so why not use Rodinal, which offers dev times typically over twelve minutes at 68F?

It takes 35 sec to pour 820mL into a Kindermann 2x120 stainless-steel tank through the light-tight baffle in the lid. That's almost 20% of a 5-minute dev time! Bound to be troublesome...
I was concerned about the filling time as well. My first few attempts were with Nikor tanks (single and double reel) and it was taking me some time to fill them. I then started tilting the tank and the fill times were reduced to something around 10-12 seconds or so.

One of the reasons I moved to a Jobo tank was because of the faster fill time and the fact that the tank filled more evenly from bottom to top. I'm able to get the developer into the tank in about 5-7 seconds now which I thought would be quick enough for a 6.5 minute development time.

Maybe moving to an even higher developer dilution to extend the developing time will help.
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  #30  
Old 17th May 2022, 06:09 PM
loganca loganca is offline
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Originally Posted by Stocky View Post
Have a look at this. Similar problem, same developer.

https://www.photo.net/discuss/thread...ative.5528144/
Thanks! Shockingly similar to my problem, not sure how my Google search didn't find this thread when I looked earlier.
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